Moon Cup - Everything You Need To Know

Updated: Jul 20, 2018


So you might have seen a menstrual cup, moon cup or some other named cup every now and then over on instagram or blog land...but what is it?


Essentially, a menstrual cup is exactly that, a reusable cup used in replace of the usual female period toiletries - ie...towels and tampons. 

An average woman throws away 250 to 300 pounds of tampons, pads and applicators in her lifetime.

If your a guy, look away - things may get graphic and although I am a firm believer now that a period is a sacred thing, a reminder of how the female body is pretty darn incredible, I accept that a lot of people get the creeps when blood or genitalia is spoken about.


Why did I choose to try one? I am on a mission to consciously reduce the amount of plastic I use and contribute to... I still buy things with plastic or in plastic, but try my best to get alternatives when I can to help out as much as I can bit by bit. 


Follow the link below to a section of The Mooncups's website, where they share some pretty shocking statistics....

https://keeper.com/learn-more/gentle-earth/


Such as...


"Plastic tampon applicators from sewage outfalls are one of the most common forms of trash on beaches."


An average woman throws away 250 to 300 pounds of tampons, pads and applicators in her lifetime.


It struck me when I was awaiting my next moontime just how much plastic and waste is produced from the usual tampons and sanitary towels, and how I felt pretty helpless in this - in that, I couldn't just order my period away. I'd heard of reusable clothes or something like that, but didn't appeal to me to be honest, too much washing and faffing. 


So much to my boyfriends confusion when I told him I was buying a mooncup for my period and it was £20...I clicked order. 


So the mooncup comes in two sizes, one for ladies that have had children, or who are older than 30 I believe, or for those of which these do not apply. Although technically mine was the latter, thereby being smaller, it still looked pretty big to me when it arrived. 


General use is pretty simple and straightforward, sterilise before first use, wash in between,  and sterilise for next moontime. 


Although the cup seems big, made of silicone, it is easily foldable...to insert you simply fold in whichever way allows you to gently put it in yourself. The key here is to be able to keep it folded long enough for it to be inserted properly, otherwise it unfolds, and you have to start again. 

I admit the first 2-3 times this required a couple of tries with my boyfriend waiting on the door for us to leave to go out and me just shouting GIVE ME 5 MINS I'M BUSYYYYYYYY. But hey, practice makes perfect. 


The cup works with a kind of suction, meaning that once you have it in place, it will hold there. 

It comes with a stick or long end on the bottom, and this is how you can easily take the cup out, so no panic on how you will get this cup out once it's in!


It takes a little patience removing it so not to cause a mess but it is fine and then all you do is remove any blood and clean the cup before reinserting. 


I hope this isn't too graphic but it couldn't be much more of a graphic subject...could it?


So the pros....

- environmentally and earth friendly

- you don't have to worry about remembering things all the time, the amount of times I've been caught out having forgotten to take towels, pads or running out is next to none.

- purse friendly, this saves so much money in the long run...


The cons?

- If you get a little faint thinking about blood, emptying the cup and seeing a mini goblet of blood can take some getting used too...

- as with tampons due to it's internal usage during a period, TS Syndrome is a very very rare possibility but still as opposed to sanitary towels, it has this, ways to keep this possibility at an all time low low low, is to take it out every 4-6 hours, I do every 4, and make sure it is cleaned, and your hands are clean before reinserting. 

If your concerned, you can check out this info on the MoonCup page regarding this.... https://www.mooncup.co.uk/using-mooncup/can-you-get-toxic-shock-syndrome-from-a-menstrual-cup/

To conclude? 

I love my mooncup, using it for the first time during my last moontime felt liberating and much cleaner, and I felt so happy knowing that I was making that little change to reduce some of my personal plastic use. 

I hope you found this helpful!


Until next time, 

Atlanta

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